Archive for the ‘Graphs’ Category

Campylobacteriosis in Iceland

Wednesday, August 6th, 2014

A recent posting in ProMED belies the fact that Iceland reports the lowest rates of campylobacteriosis in that region of Europe. [1-2] See graph [3] Note that an earlier outbreak (436 cases) was reported in 1999.

IcelandCampy

References:
1. Berger SA. Infectious Diseases of Iceland, 2014 371 pages, 75 graphs, 1,455 references. Gideon e-books, http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/country/infectious-diseases-of-iceland/
2. Berger SA. Campylobacteriosis: Global Status, 2014 104 pages, 96 graphs, 1,073 references. Gideon e-books, http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/disease/campylobacteriosis-global-status/
3. Gideon graph tool at http://www.gideononline.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/Gideon-Graphs.pps

Lyme Disease in New York

Monday, July 28th, 2014

The incidence of Lyme disese in New York State has changed little over the years, in contrast to increasing rates reported on a national level. [1,2] See graph

LymeUSvNY

References:
1. Berger SA. Infectious Diseases of the United States, 2014. 1145 pages, 478 graphs, 12,294 references. Gideon e-books, LymeUSvNY“>http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/country/infectious-diseases-of-the-united-states/
2. Berger SA. Lyme Disease: Global Status, 2014. 77 pages, 66 graphs, 786 references. Gideon e-books, http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/disease/lyme-disease-global-status/

Note featured on ProMED

Deaths from Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

Friday, June 27th, 2014

During 1961 to 1970, 207 deaths were ascribed to Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF); and an estimated 612 patients died of the disease during 1983 to 1998. The highest mortality, 50 cases, was reported in 1970. In recent years, the case-fatality rate for RMSF has remained fairly constant at 0.4% to 0.8%. Among the tick-borne infections, Lyme disease has now eclipsed RMSF as a cause of death in the United States – see graph [1, 2]

TickDeaths

References:
1. Berger SA. Infectious Diseases of the United States, 2014. 1145 pages, 478 graphs, 12294 references. Gideon e-books, http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/country/infectious-diseases-of-the-united-states/
2. Gideon graph tool – http://www.gideononline.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/Gideon-Graphs.pps

Brucellosis Rates in Armenia

Monday, May 26th, 2014

The following graph summarizes rates of brucellosis in Armenia and neighboring countries. [1-3]

BrucellosisRates

References:
1. Berger SA. Infectious Diseases of Armenia, 2014. 383 pages. 82 graphs, 1,424 references. Gideon e-books, http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/country/infectious-diseases-of-armenia/
2. Berger SA. Brucellosis: Global Status, 2014. 137 pages, 136 graphs, 1,137 references. Gideon e-books, http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/disease/brucellosis-global-status/
3. Gideon graph tool – see http://www.gideononline.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/Gideon-Graphs.pps

Australia: Barmah Forest Disease vs. Ross River Disease

Monday, April 21st, 2014

Rates of Barmah Forest disease in Queensland, and Australia as a whole, have now overtaken those of Ross River disease [1-3] – see graph

BFD-RRF

1. Berger SA. Infectious Diseases of Australia, 2014. 575 pages, 163 graphs, 3,658 references. Gideon e-books, http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/country/infectious-diseases-of-australia/
2. Berger SA. Australo-Pacific Arboviruses: Global Status, 2014. 33 pages, 20 graphs, 336 references. http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/disease/australo-pacific-arboviruses-global-status/
3. Gideon graph tool – http://www.gideononline.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/Gideon-Graphs.pps

Pasteurellosis in England and Wales

Sunday, April 20th, 2014

Few countries publish reports of Pasteurella multocida infection on a national level. The incidence of human pasteurellosis in the United Kingdom increased from 172 cases in 1972, to 426 in 2006 and 466 in 2007. Five fatal cases were reported during 1993 to 2006. Reporting trends for P. multicida infection in England and Wales are depicted in the following graph:

Pmultocida-UK

Reference:
1. Berger SA. Infectious Diseases of the United Kingdom, 2014. 1,154 pages, 959 graphs, 4,208 references. Gideon e-books,

Note featured on ProMED

Botulism in Italy

Sunday, March 30th, 2014

The following background information of botulism in Italy was abstracted from Gideon www.GideonOnline.com and the Gideon e-book series. [1,2] (primary references are available on request).

Botulism has been a notifiable disease in Italy since 1975. Mean disease rates are similar to those reported in the United States – see graph [3] :

Botulism-Italy

Vegetable preserves are implicated in 57% of cases, and ham and sausage in 15%. Recent outbreaks have been related to mushrooms in oil, pickled olives, fresh-cheese mascarpone and roasted eggplant in oil.

In 2012, a man in England acquired botulism from imported Italian olives.

Three cases of wound botulism were reported during 1988 to 1998; and the first report of wound botulism in an injecting drug user was published in 2010.

26 cases of infant botulism (and 3 of adult intestinal botulism) were reported during 1984 to 2006 (including 6 cases due to Clostridium butyricum toxin). Type A botulism accounted for 4 casers and type B for 17.

Only two outbreaks (5 cases, 1 fatal) of botulism were reported in Italy during 1903 to 1922. Five outbreaks were reported in 1998 alone.

Notable outbreaks:
1993 – Outbreaks (7 cases, in two outbreaks) of botulism were associated with commercially prepared roasted eggplant in oil.
1995 (publication year) – An outbreak was associated with consumption of home-cured ham.
1996 – An outbreak (8 cases) was ascribed to “tiramisu” which contained contaminated mascarpone cream cheese.
2004 – An outbreak (25 cases, 0 fatal) was caused by green olives served by a restaurant in Molise.
2011 – An outbreak (3 cases, 1 fatal) of botulism in Finland was caused by imported jarred olives from Italy.

References:
1. Berger SA. Infectious Diseases of Italy, 2014. 544 pages, 114 graphs, 3390 references. Gideon e-books, http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/country/infectious-diseases-of-italy/
2. Berger SA. Botulism: Global Status, 2014. 86 pages, 90 graphs, 704 references. Gideon e-books, http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/disease/botulism-global-status/
3. Gideon graph tool – http://www.gideononline.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/Gideon-Graphs.pps

Note featured on ProMed

Listeriosis in Scandinavia

Thursday, February 27th, 2014

Rates of listeriosis have been increasing in Scandinavia for over 20 years, and are currrently 2- to 5-fold those reported in the United States – see graph (black arrow = United States) [1-3]

ListeriaSweden

References:
1. Berger SA. Infectious Diseases of Sweden, 2014. 484 pages, 137 graphs, 2,231 references Gideon e-books, http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/country/infectious-diseases-of-sweden/
2. Berger SA. Listeriosis: Global Status, 2014. 101 pages, 105 graphs, 746 references. Gideon e-books, http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/disease/listeriosis-global-status/
3. Gideon graph tool – http://www.gideononline.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/Gideon-Graphs.pps

Note featured on ProMED

Bacterial Diarrhea in Australia

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

Notwithstanding recent outbreaks among men-who-have-sex-with-men, the incidence of shigellosis in Australia has remained remarkably constant for over eighty years. In the following graph I’ve contrasted disease rates in Australia and New Zealand with those reported in the United States. [1-3]

ShigANU

In fact, most other forms of bacterial diarrhea have become far more common than shigellosis in Australia – see graph:

AustDiarrhea

References:
1. Berger SA. Infectious Diseases of Australia, 2014. 575 pages, 163 graphs, 3,658 references. Gideon e-books, http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/country/infectious-diseases-of-australia/
2. Berger SA. Shigellosis: Global Status, 2014.
162 pages, 199 graphs, 1,076 references. Gideon e-books, http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/disease/shigellosis-global-status/
3. Gideon graph tool – http://cdn.gideononline.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/Gideon-Graphs.pps

MMRV – Deaths in the United States

Friday, February 21st, 2014

Death rates from varicella and other vaccine-preventable diseases in the U.S. decreased dramatically as a result of widespread vaccination. [1] In the following graph, arrows indicate the years that varicella (blue) and measles (yellow) vaccines were introduced into the standard vaccine schedule. [2]

MMRV-Deaths

References:
1. Berger SA. Infectious Diseases of the United States, 2014. 1145 pages, 478 graphs, 12294 references. Gideon e-books, http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/country/infectious-diseases-of-the-united-states/
2. Gideon graph tool – see http://cdn.gideononline.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/Gideon-Graphs.pps