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Trichinosis: Cross-border Episodes

A recent trichinosis outbreak in Belgium related to Spanish boar meat reflects the continued high incidence of trichinosis in Spain. In fact, trichinosis rates in Spain are comparable to those which have not been encountered in the United States for more than 50 years [1,2] – see graph.
Trichinosis-Spain

Cross-border incidents of trichinosis are relatively uncommon. The following chronology, including cases related to importation or human travel, is abstracted from Gideon (primary references available on request)

1975 – An outbreak (125 cases) of trichinosis in France was traced to horse meat imported from Poland.
1976 (publication year) – An outbreak (6 cases) in Paris was associated with travel to Egypt.
1985 – Outbreaks (1,073 cases, 2 fatal) in France were caused by horse meat imported from Germany and the United States.
1986 (publication year) – An outbreak (20 cases) among Gurkha soldiers serving in Hong Kong was associated with a barbecue.
1986 – An outbreak (2 cases) was reported among French-Vietnamese nationals who had eaten pork sausages at a diplomatic reception in Laos.
1990 – An outbreak (90 cases) among Southeast Asian refugees in the United States and Canada was associated with uncooked commercial pork served at a wedding in Des Moines, Iowa. This was the fourth outbreak reported since 1975 among Southeast Asian refugees in North America.
1992 – The world’s first case of human infection by Trichinella pseudospiralis was reported in New Zealand – probably acquired in Tasmania, Australia.
1982 – An outbreak (1,000 cases or more) was reported in the southern region of Lebanon – including six cases hospitalized in Israel.
1993 – An outbreak (538 cases) in France was traced to the meat of a single horse imported from Canada.
1994 – An outbreak (7 cases) in France was associated with horsemeat imported from Mexico.
1995 (publication year) – An outbreak (8 cases) in Germany and the former Yugoslavia involved family members who had shared smoked ham.
1995 to 1996 – A single case of trichinosis was reported in Japan – acquired during travel to Poland.
1997 – A Japanese traveler acquired trichinosis from smoked bear meat while in China.
1998 – An outbreak (404 cases, 37 hospitalized) in the France was related to consumption of meat from horse which had been imported from Yugoslavia.
1998 – An outbreak (92 cases, 0 fatal) in Italy was ascribed to imported Polish horsemeat.
1998 to 1999 – An outbreak (44 cases) in Germany was ascribed to raw smoked sausage (mettwurst) imported from Spain.
1999 – An outbreak (8 cases) among Yugoslavian immigrants in the United Kingdom was ascribed to salami imported from Serbia.
2000 (publication year) – An outbreak (25 cases) was reported among travelers returning to Singapore from a neighboring country.
2000 – An outbreak (8 cases) in England and Wales was ascribed to ingestion of imported meat products.
2001 – An outbreak (7 cases, none fatal) among Eastern European immigrants living in Rome was ascribed to imported pork sausage.
2002 – An outbreak (3 cases) in Germany was caused by infested smoked wild boar meat imported by travelers from Romania.
2002 – An outbreak (30 cases, 0 fatal) was reported among Thai workers in the Israel who had ingested the meat of a wild pig.
2003 (publication year) – An outbreak in Germany was reported among members of a family from Bosnia.
2003 (publication year) – A Japanese national acquired trichinosis in Kenya.
2004 – An expatriate developed Trichinella britovi infection in France from barbecued leg of jackal (Canis aureus) eaten in Algeria.
2004 – Two of the three cases of Trichinosis reported in the Czech Republic had been acquired in Poland and Macedonia.
2004 – An expatriate from New Zealand acquired trichinosis in Laos.
2004 – An outbreak (7 cases) of trichinellosis was reported Danes who had eaten home-made sausage purchased in Romania.
2004 (publication year) – An outbreak (2 cases) was reported in the Netherlands among family members who has consumed infested pork in Montenegro.
2005 – An outbreak (9 cases) of Trichinella nativa infection among French hunters in Canada was caused by contaminated bear meat. Eight additional cases were reported among persons in France who shared imported meat.
2006 – An outbreak (49 cases) in China was related to meat imported from Laos.
2007 – An outbreak (214 cases) in Poland was ascribed to contaminated raw sausage. Five cases in Germany, two in Ireland and 1 in Denmark were related to travel in the area of the outbreak.
2007 – An outbreak (21 cases) of Trichinella britovi infection among persons in Spain and Sweden was related to Spanish wild boar sausage.
2007 – An outbreak (3 cases) in Germany was caused by contaminated cured sausage eaten in Romania.
2008 – An outbreak (4 cases, 0 fatal) of trichinosis in Italy was reported among persons who had ingested infested pork in Romania.
2008 – An outbreak (8 cases) of human trichinosis associated with ingestion of raw soft-shelled turtles (Pelodiscus sinensis) was reported in Taiwan, including two cases exported to Japan. The pathogen in this case may have been Trichinella papuae.
2009 – An outbreak (3 cases) of trichinosis was reported among French nationals who had ingested warthog ham in Senegal.
2009 – An outbreak (5 cases) was reported among French tourists who ingested the meat of a grizzly bear while on a boating trip in Canada.
2009 – An outbreak of trichinosis among boar hunters in Bosnia was associated with a case hospitalized in Switzerland.
2010 – A case in Scotland was ascribed to ingestion of meat imported from France.
2011 (publication year) – A Thai worker acquired Trichinella papuae trichinosis from wild boar meat in Malaysia.

References:
1. Berger SA. Infectious Diseases of Spain, 2014. 623 pages, 194 graphs, 3,844 references. Gideon e-books. http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/country/infectious-diseases-of-spain/
2. Berger SA. Trichinosis: Global Status, 2014. 90 pages, 73 graphs, 894 references. Gideon e-books. http://www.gideononline.com/ebooks/disease/trichinosis-global-status/

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